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Photography: Have you already taken any specific courses?



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Photography: Have you already taken any specific courses?

Most people think they know how to take amazing pictures... That they really understand about photos in every single way, right? I know many people like that. However, the reality isn't quite like that.

So, speaking of your particular knowledge about photos: Is it something learned through some specific course or on its own (I mean, through video lessons or something similar)?

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Painterly

My experience has been that amateurs put a lot of emphasis on dramatic angles. They do this because they are, in fact, dramatic! It's easy to create emotional effects from simple photography that way. There's more science and hard work associated with actually using the various mechanisms of a proper camera effectively, however.

As for me, the first "proper" photography instruction I received was actually in 4H many years ago. We learned how to use exposure times, light sources, proper angles, framing, the basic mechanical operation of lenses and apertures, and focusing techniques for the emphasis of depth. I can honestly say it was pretty thorough! It's no substitution for a proper academic understanding of the equipment and techniques used in the industry, but it gave me the rudimentaries I needed to excel in college.




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iamawriter

Don't you think the cameras of today have the 'aim and shoot' concept which in other words means the camera does everything and the photographer has only to aim and shoot. Having said that there could be certain photos that may need the attention of the photographer despite what the camera features have to offer.




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TheArticulate

I think there is definitely a "point and shoot" concept to cameras now, which is what makes it so easy for people get into photography anymore. However, I think there are elements to photography that are lost to those who simply set their cameras on "auto" and shoot like that. If they learn to shoot manual and manipulate their setting appropriately, or even simply shoot in RAW as opposed to JPEG, I think they'll find that they have much, much more control over their photographs.

This is why I'm really getting into portrait photography. Anybody can set their camera up and shoot a landscape photo, but I think people find it much harder to pose and shoot a model. Getting the right expression, lighting, pose, and emotion can be tough, which is something I really enjoy about portraiture.




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iamawriter

Even with the 'auto' feature if a photographer cannot focus that will not help. I like taking photos and the results that i get are quite good compared to all those photos taken with the upgraded cell phones. I have a Sony Digital DSC H 50 and I need to do my own thing to get perfect shots. The zoom feature that it has helps me a lot though.




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TheArticulate

You miss my point completely. The 'auto' feature is actually what I would recommend if a "photographer" cannot focus, as that makes the camera do all of the focusing work for the person (after all, if someone cannot truly focus a camera, are they really even a photographer?)

My point is that someone who is shooting on a phone or a basic camera like your Sony can shoot just as good of photos as someone who's shooting on a Canon 5D MkIV if they understand their settings and composition better as well have a natural eye for photography. You could have the best camera in the entire world, but if you don't have an eye for photography, your stuff won't compare to someone who understands the craft, even if they're shooting on a phone.

The new iPhone 8 Plus has a phenomenal camera capable of capturing incredible depth of field, and I bet if you saw some photographs taken with one, you'd likely think they were taken on a high-end DSLR camera.

And what's your general approach to photography? Do shoot in RAW or JPEG? What's your preferred f-stop to shoot on in any given situation, and what focal length do you prefer for your photography? Or do you shoot everything on auto?




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iamawriter

I think someone who could be given the designation of 'photographer' surely would want to do it himself rather than have his gadget do that. The joy is totally lost if everything is given on a platter. It is fine for those who are not photographers.




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treecko142

These mechanics are already available but they just help in making the photos not look blurry, and is designed for the general public. You still need to know what you're doing to capture a better photograph.




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jeffreyjose48

When I was still in College, we have a photography subject. We just tackled it generally.




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JoeMilford

I think that it is possible for someone to have an innate talent for capturing great images, but even those who are prodigies in this could learn a lot and improve even more, in my opinion, through taking courses in photography. I think that the onset of the digital camera and the ease of use of the Smartphone's camera and its many filters and effects can possibly fool to many of us into thinking we are actually great photographers. There is a lot of skill to this craft, and I think that a bona fide photographer should be curious about the history of photography and the science of it. I am not trying to be an elitist here, and we all love our phones and our cameras, but to take this to the next level, I think, would require some study. Here's just a short article I found demonstrating some of the concerns of taking photos:
https://www.lightandmatter.org/2011/learn-photography/the-three-basics-of-photography/




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Painterly

I agree with this in full. The trouble with the "naturals" out there is that they tend to over-rely on the "tricks". They employ filters too judiciously and tend not to have a good concept of saturation. Formal education hones what nature gave them. This is especially important in photography because it's a pursuit of millimeters. The difference between an okay angle and the perfect angle can be a single breath. The difference between color that pops and color that burns your retinas can be a single click on your editing software's slider bar. THere's really no substitution for a proper education.




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DarthHazard

I think a lot of people will consider them "photographers" because of smartphones and other basic devices. Smartphones make taking a nice photo so easy that we all think we are really good at taking photos and don't need any help or courses to learn some tips and tricks. But realistically, if you gave a proper camera to someone then they will not be able to take a photo. Like you said, there is a lot of skill involved and people that can take extremely good photos should be appreciated for their talent.




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TheArticulate

This something that's becoming ever more prominent today. Besides the fact that phones now have good cameras on them, entry level DSLR cameras are becoming more and more affordable, which is why there's been such an influx of "photographers" recently.

It's really interesting. As I've started pushing my photography on Instagram, I've come into contact with tons of local photographers in my area. It's fascinating to see how different everyone's photos are, and how easy it is to tell whether or not some of these people actually have an eye for photography or not. Too many times I've seen people selling their services online, but their photos aren't composed well or properly exposed.




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iamawriter

Unless one enters competitions I wonder if a photographer really needs to equip themselves with knowledge that you are talking about. Having said that a photographer has to be artistic to spot subjects that are worthy of a click.

The photo that you see here is that of a dead bark. I doubt if that would attract anyone unless they have some kind of art in them. It did attract me (lol) I did not have my camera that day and i asked my friend to use her cellphone camera. Photography: Have you already taken any specific courses?




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Authord

Hmm, never heard of talents that has to do with taking pictures though. But well anything can be a talent, or should we say, when one is good at something, we call them his talents.
Thanks for sharing that article, I really find it useful and informative.




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Martinsx1

Having being a graduate of mass communication, during the course of my years in the university, I took on a course known as photojournalism. What this course centered on was on how to tell more stories with pictures than just words. We were taught how to maximize the use of camera in getting the best picture that tells more about something. Not all pictures tells a story, so it's the mastering of getting a picture that tells a story is what the course is all about.




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TheArticulate

I started working really hard at portrait photography about two months ago, and the growth I've seen as a photographer has been incredible. I haven't taken any photography courses at all, and all of my knowledge comes from watching videos on YouTube, reading photography blogs, or most importantly: getting outside and shooting with people.

I have a friend who started getting into portraiture about the same time I did. I was lining up model after model to shoot with me, and he asked if he could tag along with me to some of my shoots. I let him, and it was eye opening to have a second set of pictures of the same model to compare my style with. He and I both learned an immense amount about our own styles by looking at each other's photos and talking about what we liked and didn't like about various shots we got. To me, this helped me grow faster in my passion than any photography class could have helped me grow.

For example, I learned to pay much more attention to my focal length and composition/shooting angles while with my friend. We'd shoot the same model doing the same motion, but we'd often times get different results from our photographs, which helped me realize what I wanted to do the same or differently about my own work. I'll explain what I mean:

Here's a shot I took at one of our most recent shoots:
I think it's a good enough picture, and I liked the model's expression, but there really wasn't anything that stood out about it. I couldn't put my finger on it until I saw my friend's photo.
Photography: Have you already taken any specific courses?

My friend took a similar shot from an angle instead of head-on like I did and at 35mm in stead of 24mm, which turned out great. I absolutely loved this shot that he got:
Photography: Have you already taken any specific courses?

One more comparison in regards to camera angles, my friend took this shot outside of a building while I was taking the exact same shot:
It's got a really dark feel to it that I like, and the vibrance really draws me in, but I'm a "face" person, and the fact that I can't see the model's face or expression too well is what turns me away from the photo a little bit.
Photography: Have you already taken any specific courses?

My shot was from a significantly different angle, and I really prefer the way mine turned out in this case. I shot wider than my friend, which allowed the model's hand to fit in frame, as well as captured more of her expression (as well as the reflection of the lights in her eyes, which blew me away!):
Photography: Have you already taken any specific courses?

I guess what I'm trying to say is that in my opinion, the best way to learn is go out and shoot, shoot, shoot! Take as many photos as you can and learn along the way!




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TheArticulate

Also, here's a couple "behind the scenes" photos because I think it's fun to share that kind of stuff. Here's a shot me friend took of my getting the picture I wanted, as well as the final photo I was taking:

Photography: Have you already taken any specific courses?

Photography: Have you already taken any specific courses?




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iamawriter

No matter how great a camera that would be unless one has great experience it is difficult to get those perfect shots. As they say practice makes one perfect. Also a photographer has to be passionate with his hobby and should have an eye for art.




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wiseagent

"... the best way to learn is go out and shoot, shoot, shoot!"

I totally agree with you on this. This is really a must!

However, this is something that only works when the person is really interested in practicing and not just taking photography as a simple hobby.

Talking about the photos you posted, I simply loved the third photo (the one with the face very close, in profile). It's amazing! Plus, the model is very beautiful. Photography: Have you already taken any specific courses?




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TheArticulate

You're absolutely right, you need to have the passion and the drive to make the connections and get out and shoot.

I'm the kind of person who can learn well enough from watching videos or reading blogs, but I really have to get out and actually put the knowledge into use to really solidify my understandings. Not everyone is that way, so I totally get it!




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wiseagent

For more knowledge that you can acquire from the most important and respected sources on any subject, if you never put them into practice... You'll never be able to say, in fact, that you have learned them.

Considering that the frustration in the initial steps is almost 100% certain, you really need to like what you are doing so there is not an easy quitting.




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Tronia

I have never taken any specific courses regarding the photography but I do love to take pictures. I am an amateur and I just sort of capture whatever I find interesting or beautiful. Sometimes it looks stunning, sometimes it doesn't. I think that unless you will specifically try to go down the photography road as a professional or a serious hobby, it isn't worth taking a course because most often you will need a really good camera.

Also, there are great books that explain many aspects of photography such as the lighting, what to look for, how to capture things in a certain angle and more.




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Painterly

It's worth noting that there are $600 models that can be very effective, even in an amateur's hands. I wouldn't call that cheap, but it's definitely within reach of just about anyone if they're willing to take the time to save up for it. That alone can act as a good firewall. If you don't have the will to save up for a $600 device, you probably aren't all that interested in it in the first place. Worst case scenario, you start and decide later you really aren't interested, but now you have a pool of money to throw into savings or at something you actually would like to do, so I wouldn't discourage anyone from starting down that road.




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iamawriter

With gadgets these days that do everything for you, I agree with you that unless one is interested in becoming a professional photographer there is no point in going through any course. Having said that having a passion for photography I would not want my gadget to do everything for me.




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DarthHazard

I wouldn't say that I am amazing at photography but I am pretty good and that is all thanks to the many articles that I have read online and the videos I have watched. Personally, I would not take any specific courses because a lot of them are just a waste of time because they try to make you feel like an amateur. That may be good but most people already know the basics of photography. Videos are great because you can get tips from professionals and see a proper demonstration of what they are saying.




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wiseagent

I can say that I'm in the same boat as you, haha.

I have never taken any professional courses about photography and my knowledge is almost entirely coming from books, video lessons (it's amazing how much you can learn from this option) and specific articles.

So far, I think I'm doing great.




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TheArticulate

It sounds like you're learning the ropes on photography the same way I am. I'm curious to see what you shoot! Do you have an online portfolio or anyway that I could see some of your work?




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Martinsx1

You are absolutely right about pointing out the need for getting tips from professionals already in the field to help sharpen your skills up a bit is very important. Just reading the theoritcal aspect of photography is different from actually practicing it.




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Barida

I have not started any course on how to be taking amazing pictures, and the funny thing is that I'm that type of person that likes taking photos. I am already planning to research on the ones that I can take online. I really want to get professional with taking photos and covering video events.




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TheArticulate

If you haven't already, you should check out Mango Street on YouTube. They're a photography and video couple who produce really high quality videos teaching different aspects of photography and video. Their stuff is concise, informative, and to the point, and it's been a huge resource to me for my photography.




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Barida

I'm glad that you recommended the Mango Street for me on YouTube. I will try to have a look at it and see how I can learn from the teachings that they do on photography. I will give you a feedback when I have checked them out.




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wiseagent

Barida,

If you already like taking pictures, I would say that this can already be considered as half way to the right place.

Like TheArticulate said, Mango Street on YouTube is really a good / fun place to get started because their approach is very simple, dynamic and consistent (everything is well friendly and inviting).




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Barida

yeah, I enjoy doing so and I will try to have a look at the YouTube channel of Mango Tree to see the reason they are termed exceptional.




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Painterly

If you live in a large enough own you likely have a community center. There's a solid chance that at some point in the year public enrichment classes will be offered through them. These are often low-cost, or even free! They tend to be hosted by teachers who are looking for enrichment during the summer, or well-practiced amateurs who have something to pass on. It's not a replacement for true academic level instruction, but it's a great way to get access to a proctored lesson. You cannot write off the importance of that; youtube videos are nice, but when you have a specific issue you need one on one instruction.




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Baburra

I took a few courses at my university although admittedly I don't think I learned all that much because the structure wasn't that good. I would have preferred if more resources were provided for me considering a lot was being paid for that course, but still, I guess I at least learned a few things. I just feel what I learned was too basic and were things I already knew or could have just learned online. I think these days you should just learn online and save yourself some money so you could just spend that on equipment instead.




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TheArticulate

Photography courses certainly aren't for everyone, but I think there's something that can be said for taking them, as well. I agree with you, I improved my photography by leaps and bounds on my own simply by watching videos online and figuring out my style by shooting, shooting, shooting. However, I think that a photography class can be beneficial for beginners (even if you don't learn a whole lot) simply because it'll put you in contact with other budding photographers who share a common passion as you.

One of the best things I do to improve my photography anymore is to shoot with other local photographers. I lean a ton by watching someone else do their thing. Seeing how someone else looks at light, poses models, or directs people can be incredibly beneficial. Networking is important in nearly anything you do, and photography classes could help with that!




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DenisP

I think it is possible to have a talent (an eye for photography, as they say) and take wonderful photos without having gone through any sort of course. My thoughts are backed by my experience with taking photo courses in college. I went to college for Graphic Design and Advertising, and I took two courses of Digital Photography as part of my elective classes. I learned more about the technical aspects of photography, like how cameras work and the exact effect of all your DSLR settings on the quality of an image, and how to setup and use different types of studio lighting. However, the overall composition and style of my photography remained unaffected. For example, when learning about composition my professors taught us about the Rule of Thirds, and even though I wasn't familiar with that technique, most of my photos already followed those rules because it was just what looked good to me.




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TheArticulate

You make good points. You can teach someone the technical aspects of photography (f-stop, focal length, ISO, etc), but teaching someone how to have an eye for it is something completely different. You can hone your eye, for sure, but I don't know that it's something everyone can learn to have.

Your comment about the rule of thirds intrigues me, because my eye for photography is something that's been on my mind more and more recently. It sounds like you already had a good eye if you were naturally composing things using the rule of thirds before you even learned about it!




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DenisP

Well first off thank you, I consider that a compliment. But yeah I honestly don't think I can attribute my eye for photography to anything other than pure instinct. Something about centering your subject in photos always felt too straight forward to me. It was like "HERE! I obviously want you to look at this."

Come to think of it, another factor (albeit a bit of an odd circumstance) for me already applying the rule of thirds may have been from simply observing computer backgrounds I had growing up. I would often have these minimalist wallpapers of video game characters, and the designers would usually place them either off to the left or right side, but never in the center. That always looked good to me yet I never understood why, until I learned about the rule of thirds.




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Soulwatcher

I am really good at taking nature pictures. I haven't had any courses and I am self taught. How I learned is from looking at other peoples pictures and I would try and recapture the angles. And now I have taken so many pictures that I don't even bother to look at other peoples pictures for ideas.




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iamawriter

In today's digital world photography is cakewalk. With so many features all what one needs to do is click. But click after focussing perfectly. A passionate photographer like me will get it correctly after some experience. Most of what I click is satisfactory. I have posted some of my photos for a contest and have received a lot of appreciatoon.




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TheArticulate

Have you ever heard of Gurushots? It's a photography contest website that always has several categories on rotation for you to submit your photos to. It's a really neat concept, and if you win one, there's always cash prizes of some sort available.

You say you're really passionate about photography, so I thought this might be something that'd interest you.




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kammy143

Learning by doing. I think experience is the best teacher in all aspects of learning. Some people may come as natural and some may not, but when it comes to being good at what you do, you must do it wholeheartedly. Most people now a days take it in consideration to have the familiarity of the skills and enriching it as they progress on their craft. Having courses and tutorials also helps in enriching talents better.




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TheArticulate

This is exactly the method I used in order to get where I am currently with photography. I read up on techniques and gear on various blogs, but I really couldn't get a feel for what I needed to do to improve my photography until I started actively shooting.

Shooting with different models, and with other photographers, has taught me a lot about what I do well, and I what I need to improve or change on.




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kammy143

I know, right? Experience is really the best teacher ever. Once you got a hang of it, that would be the time that you gradually improve it. It takes time, but it would surely pay off.




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vinaya

I was a sixth grader when my father bought a professional camera. He was a news journalist and wanted to enhance his reporting with pictures. I was fascinated with my father's camera. My father was not a trained photographer, however, he knew some tricks. I learned photography lesson from him. I have not taken any photography lessons, however, I love to call myself hobbyist photographer. On Hubpages.com my photo stories have won awards. I was even asked by an Australian magazine to develop story based on my photo story.




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ballyhara

I took some photography lessons, as a part of my college extra credit points. My teacher was great, he really has a natural talent for catching great moments to capture. Unfortunately, I didn't have a good camera, and still don't. But I visited beautiful places with my friends, and had some nice pictures too. I would like to improve my basic knowledge on photography, specially on black and white pictures, love the oldies ones.




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TheArticulate

Use your cell phone camera until you get a good camera! I think people get caught up in the idea that you need to have the best gear to capture the best photographs, but I don't think that's the case at all. Anymore, everyone has a camera in their pocket, and especially since you're interesting in black and white photography, perhaps a cell phone would be a great place for you to start!

If anything, it'll start to give you a feel for what to look for and how to train your eye for b&w shots.




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ballyhara

In fact, I've been doing that haha. Took some b&w selfies with my cellphone and they look better than the color ones. And yes, honestly you don't need to have the best camera, but let's face it, a good camera never let you down.




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cubo

No, I haven't. I would like to take a course of how to take great pictures but I need to buy me a professional camera. I don't want to be a professional photographer but it could be a great hobby and it worths to learn new things because you don't know when you or someone else could need a photographer.




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TheArticulate

Entry-level DSLR cameras can be very affordable, if you have a couple hundred dollars to spend. This is one of the reasons that so many people are getting into photography anymore.

I think the beauty of things nowadays is that almost everyone has a camera in their pocket. The cameras on your cell phone can be very powerful, and even if they don't take the same quality pictures as a high end camera, they can be a great starting place to begin training your eye for what to look for in photographs.




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cubo

Oh, thanks for the tip.
Yes, I use to take pictures with my phone camera, specifically, nature pictures only. My phone helps me a lot but just during the daylight because, at night, my phone doesn't have the capacity of taking good pictures. That's why I need a professional camera.




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TheArticulate

That's a great point. Night photography is definitely something you'll need a higher end camera for. I wish you much luck in your endeavors! Once you've got a good DSLR, you can start messing with long exposure photography and the likes after dark, which is super cool.




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mdbree17

I always wanted to enroll in courses which helps me to develop my skills in Photography. I may take good photos but as an amateur.




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wiseagent

A technical course (something deeper) on the subject is always the best option... But, with the advancement of the internet, I think YouTube channels and specialized forums can be considered a great and useful tool.




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Martinsx1

If you don't have the opportunity to enroll in physical class to participate in the photography lessons and get your skills tuned up, don't worry too much about it, you can easily make use of online classes. You can get good lessons using YouTube channel. I made use of it even when I was into a real professional course, I used the works I saw in the YouTube to compare and contrast when I have been taught and learnt.




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Authord

I didn't even know that, photography has a course , back then in my school days, I usually think this guys that take awesome pictures, just wake up one day and started taking the pictures. I have not really taken any course a bout that, but I will take them soon, now that I'm in need of pictures, with a professional touch.




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mildredtabitha

I did not think one needs to take a course in photography since I have seen many nice pictures and I thought it was the type of camera that determined the quality of photos. I have been seeing other people taking nice pictures and even making money out of it without having a certificate in photography.




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tiffiecute

Photography happened to be one of our major subjects in Mass Communication way back at my University. I did not have a clue prior to taking that subject, that it can be very interesting and it won't be easy if you intend to be a professional photographer.

I completed and passed photography with flying colors because I loved every learning I absorbed in those 6 months. I guess if you love what you're doing, it will come easy. Furthermore, photography does not rely on skill alone as one needs to have that touch of talent to produce outstanding shots.




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anjanetteclyde2

I have not yet taken any course related to Photography but I like to. If I will be given a chance to take a course for Photography, I would be willing to take it religiously. Many of us really like taking pictures especially now that we have this so called Social Media. We are fond of sharing almost everything that we have, we see and we experience hence we capture those moments with a picture. And so, to have more knowledge about Photography will be a great help for us to tell the world everything on each picture we share, highlighting what we really meant from each of it.




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gelotologist

I think, it's probably not the course or the things you learn from schools, but I know you'll probably need it if you're putting your photography skills on profession. But also, its actually because of the experience you have, like you tend to have fun taking or capturing photos, not knowing you have potential.




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Kakashi2020

I did enrolled in a 2day basic photography course a few years back and I learned a lot specially on how to properly shoot photos outdoors and indoors.

The 2 day training course i attended was very informative, topics includes:

How to take care of your camera, lens and other photography equipment.

Camera settings

Choosing the correct subject.

Correct Lighting and Equipment.

Indoor and outdoor shoot.

What I like about it was all participants where made into models so we took pictures of each other and the person who has the best photo and the runner-up wins an invite for a photoshoot.

I didn't win!




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Jral14

I didn't enroll to any photography class. I just learned it on my own. When I was in 12th grade, we had a film competition by section. Since we have 8 sections in total, there will be a lot of competitors. I was assigned as an actor that time but I never thought that I will be a good director and cinematographer. I haven't enrolled to any of the courses but most of my friends and professor says that I have a great skill in this field. Just to give you my secret: I just watch different kinds of film everyday; it can be horror, romance, ficitons - name it all. Then during my free time, I always wonder how camera moves and how the effects and edit were added. At first I was into videography. But at a certain time, I was curious if the skills I have learned in videography can be also done to photography. Then boom, it worked perfectly. The difference of the two is that the photography are just still images. Then that was the start of my passion on these field.




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treecko142

While some people just have a natural talent in photography and a particular "eye" in getting more beautiful angles, not everything can be obtained through talent alone, and so even those who don't have special classes actually take time to teach themselves through various resources available online. Studying specific courses through a school or learning from a distinguished photographer will help you elevate your photography skills to a next level.




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Martinsx1

Anyone who can operate a camera or an android phone don't need much course to be good with the art of photography, at least on an average scale. Even before studying photography professional course in the university, I'm averagely good when it comes to taking pictures. I'm always the one given the task of snapping pictures when we are in a group, if the work is given to another person, the pictures would end up being blur but when I have it done, it's always exceptionally good.




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aecel

I haven't taken any courses at photography though I love to do it. Recently, I was with my uncle and his boss we were invited to a birthday party of our relative and his boss told me that they're attending photography lesson that's going to end for 2 months it's just a short course but they're going to have a certificate for completing the course. I got amazed with their cameras and long lenses. I asked him, why do they need to enroll can't they just do self-taught and read tutorials he said they want certificate so they can be called as a professional photographer. It's pleasing to ears when someone calls you professional photographers. I hope I would also be able to enroll photography someday.




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jennyfermanuel

You are so much blessed if your parents were able to provide giving you your "wants" as a child, to support you on the things that you love and dreamed of. As a kid, my dream actually is to become a photographer. I love staring on the beauty of nature. There is a whisper telling me "You must take a picture of that thing, because it won't always be as beautiful as it is right now. So go on, you don't want to miss any chance to capture the beauty you have in front of you". But I can't. I envy those children who had all the chances and ability to do what they really love to.
So regarding with your question, no. My parents can't even buy me a camera, so as sending me to an art school who teaches good photography. And about your second question, I guess it is more on how passionate the photographer is. Anyone who loves what he is doing, will have a great and beautiful result.




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stbrians

Sometimes these things just come with practice. I never went to any school to take images. I just practiced and practice makes perfect. I cannot say I am perfect but if I get chance I might go to school to learn one thing or two




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amelia88

I haven't done any courses yet, but it's something I'm considering. I feel like photography is just getting better and better and I don't know that my current skills can keep up with what everyone else out there is capable of!

I'll have to see what's available in my local area.




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jpk0007

Actually I have been planning to join a basic photography course from a professional photographer for many years now but unfortunately, have not found the time to do it. I simply love to take pictures of everything possible. photography is one of my favorite hobby and clicking pictures has become very easy nowadays due to the smartphones available with all of us. However, it is very essential to learn at least the basics from a professional




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Kakashi2020

I've taken some classes in basic photography years ago and it really helped me a lot over the years. Presently I'm thinking of enrolling in a Food Photography class, because I like to focus more in becoming a food blogger and I feel that being trained in Food Photography would give me the skills needed in becoming a successful food blogger. Food Blogging is very lucrative these days, a friend of mine is earning $200 per week minimum as a part-time food blogger.




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